Friday, February 02, 2007

Candid Statement by Dog Dealer Exposes Reality of Dog Trade to Medical Schools and Animal Testing Facilities

Here in Colorado we face the same issue. The School of Medicine at the University of Colorado is part of the last remaining schools that insist on using the antiqued method of vivisection. As you’ll see below in the quote by Dr. Aysha Akhtar, of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, "…over 85 percent of medical schools disagree with the need to use live dog labs." This includes the top medical schools like Harvard.

So, where do the schools get the live dogs? Well, the lowest of the low – class B USDA dealers. You can read about these scum at:
http://geari.blogspot.com/2006/02/
bill-in-congress-would-eliminate-class.html

Surprisingly, this dealer was very candid about his actions:

“These hounds, he added, are "just young dogs" that were bred as hunting dogs but, despite "being given plenty of chances to learn to hunt," failed and would be killed.”

So, because they were failures in the eyes of hunters they deserve to live their lives out in fear at some medical lab??

You’ll see below why live animal use in medical school curriculum is unnecessary. You’ll also see that the Humane Society listed below doesn’t sell dogs to dealers but many pounds do.

Please read more about the issue of class B USDA Bunches and about the use of live animals in medical school curriculum at the following links:

http://www.pcrm.org/resch/meded/mcw_doglab/ - about dog labs and why they are unecessary

http://www.hbo.com/docs/programs/dealingdogs/index.html

http://geari.blogspot.com/2006/07/
noted-class-b-dog-and-cat-dealer-cc.html

For more information on CC Baird, USDA Class B dog and cat dealers, why they need to be stopped and the Pet Safety and Protection Act that aims to stop the slimy world of Class B dealers see
http://geari.blogspot.com/2006/02/
bill-in-congress-would-eliminate-class.html

Also see what you can do to help stop Class B dealers and how to support the Pet Safety and Protection Act at the links at the end of the story or at http://www.dealingdogs.com/


Article:

Pit bulls not subject to experimentation

http://www.madison.com/tct/news/index.php?ntid=117064&ntpid=0


Humane Society does not give live animals to labs
By Timothy Garrett
Correspondent for The Capital Times

A regulated market for dogs to be killed for medical research will not draw from any of the pit bulls that have been held as criminal evidence at the Dane County Humane Society.

At least 25 of the 47 dogs are scheduled for euthanasia, but the shelter's policy is never to turn live animals over to research facilities, Humane Society board president Cathy Holmes said Tuesday. Only animal cadavers, she added, have been given to the University of Wisconsin for research.

Instead, the dogs used for research - lately a chief concern for local and national animal rights groups - are typically taken from kennels, said one licensed dog dealer.

Kenneth Schroeder, of Wells, Minn., sells dogs to the Wisconsin College of Medicine, among other clients, and said in a phone interview that he gets none of his dogs from shelters or pounds.

"Why would I even try?" he said. "I have such a surplus of hounds."

These hounds, he added, are "just young dogs" that were bred as hunting dogs but, despite "being given plenty of chances to learn to hunt," failed and would be killed.

Increasingly, animal rights groups such as the Madison-based Alliance for Animals are focusing their attention on dogs that die after medical students vivisect them to study the cardiovascular system. These groups argue that with advances in computer simulations, live subjects are no longer needed.

Next month, the Wisconsin College of Medicine, in Milwaukee, will use about 60 dogs as its first-year medical students learn to operate on the cardiovascular system.

Madison resident Ann Emerson, a member of the Alliance for Animals and an opponent of primate vivisection at the UW, said that only a few remaining medical schools are "doing this unnecessary surgery when there are alternatives."

Emerson was among roughly 100 demonstrators who joined a recent protest against the Wisconsin College of Medicine that was organized by the Wisconsin Humane Society and the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, which is based in Washington, D.C.

As the protestors waved signs and bore some of January's chillier weather, the Wisconsin College of Medicine served them hot coffee and bottled water.

Medical College of Wisconsin spokesman Richard Katschke said that although the school uses some simulators, "the dog is considered the best model of the human cardiovascular system."

"Our computer models are considered to be some of the best in the nation," he added. "Nevertheless, computers are not living beings."

Dr. Aysha Akhtar, of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, said at the rally last week that "over 85 percent of medical schools disagree with the need to use live dog labs."

The dogs have yet to be delivered to the medical school by Schroeder, who repeated that everything is done legally and encouraged those fighting for animal rights to visit a children's trauma ward in a hospital.


Published: January 31, 2007

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