Friday, January 26, 2007

Downed Animal and Food Safety Protection Act, H.R. 661 Introduced Into House: Would End Slaughter for Food of Sick, Diseased, or Injured Livestock

This legislation is beyond necessary. Downed animals have suffered enough in their trip to the slaughter house. To then put them through the hell of the slaughter facility is just beyond cruel. In addition, sick animals put those who eat them at risk.

For more on downed animals see http://www.nodowners.org/

I think this quote taken from thee article below really sums up the issue:

"I can't believe that in the 21st Century there is anyone who thinks it's appropriate to allow sick, diseased, or injured livestock incapable of supporting their own body weight to be part of our food supply," he said. "Congress must do something to prevent the contamination of our food supply and also insist that these downed animals be dealt with humanely."

Article:

LaTourette co-introduces legislation to ban slaughter of downed animals

http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=17767710&BRD=
1698&PAG=461&dept_id=21849&rfi=6

By: John Arthur Hutchison

JHutchison@News-Herald.com
01/26/2007

U.S. Reps. Steven C. LaTourette, R-Concord Township, and Gary Ackerman, D-N.Y., introduced legislation they say is intended to help safeguard the country's food supply by banning the slaughter of downed animals like cattle that are too sick or injured to stand or walk.

The Downed Animal and Food Safety Protection Act, H.R. 661, has 75 original co-sponsors in the U.S. House of Representatives. A companion bill is being introduced in the U.S. Senate by Sen. Daniel Akaka, D-Hawaii.

The measures are supported by the Humane Society of the United States.
"We hope the new Congress will act quickly to settle this issue and protect animals and consumers by permanently banning downed animals from the food supply," Wayne Pacelle, HSUS president and chief executive officer, said in a news release.

The House and Senate previously approved downed animal legislation, but it has been blocked from final passage by some former members of the House Agriculture Committee and Agriculture Appropriations Subcommittee, LaTourette said.

"I can't believe that in the 21st Century there is anyone who thinks it's appropriate to allow sick, diseased, or injured livestock incapable of supporting their own body weight to be part of our food supply," he said. "Congress must do something to prevent the contamination of our food supply and also insist that these downed animals be dealt with humanely."

The U.S. Department of Agriculture banned the slaughter of downed cattle in 2004 following the discovery of mad cow disease in the United States, but the policy was never finalized or fully enforced, LaTourette said.

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