Friday, December 16, 2005

PETA vs. WickedWildlifeFund AKA World WildLife Fund (WWF). The World WildLife Fund (WWF) Now Supports Animal Testing.

Very disturbing article (see below). If this is true, the World Wild Life Fund truly is as evil as I suspected. To actually endorse animal testing is beyond confusing given the World Wild Life Funds supposed mission. As I wrote before they actually support killing elephants and other animals for a variety of reasons: http://geari.blogspot.com/2005/11/world-
wide-fund-aka-world-wildlife.html

PETA backs up it's claims against the World Wildlife Fund on it's site WickedWildlifeFund.com at http://wickedwildlifefund.com/

In this site they call the World Wildlife Fund "an organization founded by trophy hunters" that has been lobbying for "the largest animal-testing programs of all time."

And that the WWF "has been actively pressuring government agencies in the U.S., Europe and Canada to increase the amount of testing that they require for pesticides and other chemicals," and the result "has been the establishment of what threaten to be the largest animal-testing programs of all time."

And also that ... "the WWF-backed endocrine testing program will kill up to 1.2 million animals for every 1,000 chemicals tested ..."

Very disturbing. I encourage all people concerned with the truth and with the issues within animal rights to stop supporting the World Wildlife Fund. If all PETA says is true, they truly are a wicked organization.



Animal Rights Groups Engage in 'Catfight' Over Testing

By Randy Hall

Dec 15, 2005

(CNSNews.com) - Two of the largest animal rights organizations in the world are involved in what one observer called a "catfight" over the use of animals in chemical testing and in such activities as hunting, trapping and whaling.

On its WickedWildlifeFund.com website, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) criticize the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) as "an organization founded by trophy hunters" that has been lobbying for "the largest animal-testing programs of all time."

According to the site, the WWF "has been actively pressuring government agencies in the U.S., Europe and Canada to increase the amount of testing that they require for pesticides and other chemicals," and the result "has been the establishment of what threaten to be the largest animal-testing programs of all time."

PETA -- which claims to be the largest animal rights organization in the world with more than 850,000 members and supporters -- states that the WWF has "been heavily involved in establishing the framework for the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) massive chemical-testing program now under development."

For its part, the World Wildlife Fund website notes that the WWF "leads international efforts to protect endangered species and their habitats" and has nearly 1.2 million members in the U.S. and another 4 million worldwide.

"The entire WWF family is committed to providing the most up-to-date and scientifically accurate information possible for the long-term protection of wildlife," the organization's website states. "Once that information is in hand, we can take the necessary follow-up steps to save wildlife and habitat around the world."

But PETA cites scientific estimates to back up its charge that "the WWF-backed endocrine testing program will kill up to 1.2 million animals for every 1,000 chemicals tested ...

"... [W]ith environmental organizations pressing for tens of thousands of chemicals to be retested under this program, the toll in animal suffering and death will be staggering," according to PETA.

The World Wildlife Fund is pressuring government agencies in Canada and Europe to "embark on a similar animal-testing program," PETA charges. "If the WWF is truly committed to safeguarding human and animal welfare, it should be working to reduce chemical emissions and exposures, instead of calling for more cruel and useless animal testing."

WickedWildlifeFund.com
adds that the WWF, "founded in 1961 by a group of wealthy trophy hunters, apparently believes that conserving animals means keeping them around long enough for well-heeled 'sportsmen' to blast them out of the woods, oceans, skies, plains of Africa and jungles of Asia."

The website condemns the WWF for supporting "sustainable" seal hunts in Canada, whaling by native tribes, hunting for sport as a means of bringing income to poor nations, the culling -- or "killing" -- of elephants for population control and the use of steel-jaw leg-hold traps to capture animals.

Visitors to the WickedWildlifeFund.com website are invited to "write to the WWF and ask for its written commitment to stop supporting animal tests and the EPA's massive chemical-testing programs.

"Non-animal test methods are not only more humane, they are generally more rapid and economical, often producing results that are more reliable and relevant to humans than the results of tests on animals," WickedWildlifeFund.com states.

As Cybercast News Service previously reported, PETA has been critical of scientific breakthroughs obtained through animal testing, including a development in treating breast cancer that experts hailed as "stunning" and "very exciting."

However, Joseph de Feo, editor of Foundation Watch and Organization Trends for the Capital Research Center, called the conflict between the two groups a "catfight."

"PETA opposes the tests because they're worried about the animals when the benefits to humans outweigh any costs as far as animal testing goes," de Feo told Cybercast News Service. "But that doesn't mean that what the WWF is proposing is at all necessary.

"It's a situation where one side is right for the wrong reasons and the other side is just plain wrong," he added.

Calls to the World Wildlife Fund seeking comment for this article were not returned by press time.

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