Monday, September 18, 2006

Self-Obsessed Artist Spray Paints Abused Elephant for Exhibit: Calls of Abuse Follow

The worst part of this is that this elephant was actually abused in the past and is captive and forced to perform. Then she gets spray painted. Need I say more?

I’ll let these quotes speak to this idiocy:

I think it sends a very wrong message that abusing animals is not only OK, it's an art form," Boks said. "We find it no longer acceptable to dye baby chicks at Easter, but it's OK to dye an elephant."
Animal rights activist Les Schobert, a former L.A. Zoo curator, said the exhibit "degrades" the animal.
"Here we have an endangered species," Schobert said. "And we're taking it and moving it into a warehouse and painting it. It's a mockery. There's no reason. This isn't a religious ceremony in India."

Article:

Painted elephant causes stir in L.A.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060917/
ap_en_ot/painted_pachyderm_6

Sat Sep 16, 11:43 PM ET
LOS ANGELES - A city agency that allowed a spray-painted elephant to appear at an art exhibit is now saying it will not issue permits for such events in the future.
The elephant, named Tai, was given a nontoxic paint job for the Thursday opening of the "Barely Legal" exhibit by British artist Banksy near downtown.
Cards handed out at the opening, which included such guests as Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt, read: "There's an elephant in the room. There's a problem we never talk about." The statement went on to say that many people live below the poverty line.
Ed Boks, head of the city's Animal Services Department, said that his agency issued permits for the elephant to appear — to his chagrin — and that he tried to have them revoked Friday on public safety grounds. But the exhibit was to end Sunday, and the revocation would have taken five days.
"I think it sends a very wrong message that abusing animals is not only OK, it's an art form," Boks said. "We find it no longer acceptable to dye baby chicks at Easter, but it's OK to dye an elephant."
Animal rights activist Les Schobert, a former L.A. Zoo curator, said the exhibit "degrades" the animal.
"Here we have an endangered species," Schobert said. "And we're taking it and moving it into a warehouse and painting it. It's a mockery. There's no reason. This isn't a religious ceremony in India."
Tai's owner denied that the 38-year-old Indian elephant, who lives on a ranch, had been abused.
"Tai has done many, many movies," Kari Johnson said. "She's used to makeup."

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