Friday, September 22, 2006

Government of Rajasthan Plans to Relocate 15 Villages Situated Inside the Sariska Tiger Reserve to Save the Dwindling Tiger Population

Good sign to see a government acting in this way.

Article:

Rajasthan steps up efforts to save tigers

http://www.teluguportal.net/modules/news/
article.php?storyid=14597

Posted by admin on 2006/9/22 1:11:13

Jaipur, Sep 22 (IANS) Rajasthan plans to relocate 15 villages situated inside the Sariska tiger reserve in a bid to save the dwindling tiger population.

The government has identified 22,267 hectares in Nangal Rundh village near Bheror in Alwar district for resettling the villagers.

The 807-sq km park, situated 107 km from here, was declared a sanctuary in 1955 and became a National Park in 1979.

"In the first phase we plan to shift Kakvadi and Baghani villages to an area near Behror on the Jaipur-Delhi national highway," Forest Minister L.N. Dave told IANS.

As many as 130 families in Kakvadi and Baghani villages, who are into cattle rearing, are likely to be shifted in a span of three months.

Each family is likely to be offered a package of two hectares, a constructed house and Rs.100,000 as compensation. However, villagers are not happy with the compensation.

"We are holding talks with them on a regular basis to hear their grievances. We are confident of an amicable solution," a forest department official said.

After relocating villagers, the government proposes to undertake a project to rehabilitate and conserve tigers. Sariska has been in the news due to the mysterious disappearance of tigers.

According to a census conducted in 2004, there were 16 to 18 tigers in the reserve. But a March 2005 report by the Wildlife Institute of India confirmed there were no tigers in the reserve.

Apart from tigers, there are leopards, jungle cats, hyenas, jackals, spotted deer, blue bulls and wild boars.

Poachers have been blamed for the dwindling population of tigers at Sariska and Ranthambore, another national park in Rajasthan. Other animals such as leopards have also been targeted.

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